Art in Alternative Spaces

presents

Sum of the Parts 

A Woman's Perspective of the Male Figure

Drawings by Judith Roth and Sandra Bacon and Photography by David Rosenthall

Based on the live poses of award - winning body builder James Wise

This exhibition is part of ArtWalkRavenswood   (www.artwalkravenswood.org)

On display at Prudential Preferred Properties, 2156 W. Montrose, Chicago, IL

October 6 and 7, 2007  (11 am - 4 pm)

 

Sum of the Parts is both an artistic interpretation of the male figure (as posed by competitive 57-yr-old body-builder and personal trainer James Wise) in which the female gaze is represented through the perspective of two women artists - Judith Roth and Sandra Bacon; and a comparative view of Mr. Wise's body as photographed by David Rosenthall, with a focus on key muscle groups displayed during requisite poses.  

Through a series of live poses during an extended drawing session, the model experiences muscle fatigue that accentuates muscle dynamics.  Gesture poses are often more expressive, being quick and responsive.   The discipline of the figurative artist and photographer was to interpret that dynamic, which was expressed from either a short or extended pose.   

Bodybuilding is a competition sport that demands months of training culminating in a 15-minute demonstration or display.   The physical training and pressure on human endurance that happens in the preceding months is a process in reduction – much like the act of creating an artwork.   The artist too, must reduce visual language to the essential elements that will resonate with themselves and the viewer as being a revelation of some greater meaning.    All acts of creation are therefore more than the “Sum of the Parts”.

Sandra Bacon notes: "Drawing from life offers a layering of shifting perceptions.   A model's pose is in flux.   Definition of muscle isolations change in time and present a myriad of nuances for the visual artist to perceive.  The resulting drawing creates an intuitive reality that exists independently of the recorded (via photography) moment."

Judith Roth observes that it was not socially acceptable for a woman to view a live model in the study of art until the most recent 50 years or so, or even, for a woman to study art with the intent of being an artist of any note at all.   About her own artistic study, Judith says, "I view the figure as an artist; my subconscious may affect my work - that is for the viewer to interpret."

 

 

 

Women artists focus on the male figure
(http://www.pioneerlocal.com/newsstar/news/584156,sn-ravenswood-100307-s1.article)

 

October 3, 2007

Judith Roth has played an important role in the annual ArtWalkRavenswood since its inception in 2002, but none more interesting than the role of artist in the powerful "Sum of the Parts, a Woman's Perspective of the Male Figure," to be held Oct. 6 and 7.

The exhibit is one of dozens in this year's Tour of Arts & Industry in Ravenswood's art studios and galleries, museums and cultural centers, schools, theaters, restaurants, and industries.

"Sum of the Parts" - which will be on display at Prudential Preferred Properties, 2156 W. Montrose, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. both days - is an artistic interpretation of the male figure from the perspective of artists Roth and Sandra Bacon and a comparative view of the male figure as photographed by David Rosenthall.

Both the drawings and photographs focus on key muscle groups displayed during requisite poses by James Wise, a 57-year-old Chicago competitive body builder and personal trainer, who originated the idea.

According to Anatomically Correct Art in Alternative Spaces, a Chicago non-profit organization dedicated to showcasing work by visual artists in alternative spaces and sponsor of the exhibit, the concept of "Sum of the Parts" is that "bodybuilding is a competition sport that demands months of training culminating in a 15-minute demonstration or display."

The physical training and pressure on human endurance that happens in the preceding months is a process in reduction - much like the act of creating artwork. The artist too must reduce visual language to the essential elements that will resonate with themselves as the viewer as being a revelation of some greater meaning. All acts of creation are therefore more than the 'Sum of the Parts.'"

Noting the comparison of the muscle dynamics and muscle fatigue in the drawings vs. photographs, Bacon explains, "Drawing from life offers a layering of shifting perceptions. A model's pose is in flux. Definition of muscle isolations change in time and present a myriad of nuances for the visual artist to perceive. The resulting drawing creates a intuitive reality that exists independent of the recorded [via photography] moment."

Bacon, recognized more for her murals than drawings, says Rosenthall's photographs were able to capture Wise's muscles in the second of their "peak perfection," while the women's drawings - accomplished during extended sessions with Wise every Saturday throughout the winter months - capture beyond that peak moment. "The drawings are very gestural and emotional; they are very powerful. They try to get past what you think you know and what you will see. It's all about intuition," Bacon stresses.

Bacon and Roth, both members of the Chicago Women's Caucus on the Arts, are awaiting reaction to the exhibit. "These are not nudes, but there will be observers who are still not comfortable seeing these bodies in a show," Bacon states, adding, "We're very used to seeing images of the body done in a certain kind of way. When it comes to real people, we're not used to that. That's why figure drawing is so important - you're never going to get that sense of intuition without it."

Asked if she was intimidated or apprehensive about participating in the "Sum of the Parts" project, Bacon replies, "Not at all. I have a classical background and years and years of figurative painting. It was only intimidating working with Judith because she's so incredible."

Roth, who notes that it was not socially acceptable for a woman to view a live model in the study of art until the last 50 years or so, has been involved with the Ravenswood art walk since she led efforts to gain seven venues for its initial year. "It's been phenomenal. It's great for the artists, for restaurants, for buildings, for industry, for the community," the Ravenswood resident notes.

ArtWalkRavenswood will not be the last opportunity for the public to see "Sum of the Parts." Future plans call for it to appear in Anatomically Correct Alternative Spaces.

For a list of all walk venues, visit www.artwalkravenswood.org. For more about "Sum of the Parts," visit www.anatomicallycorrect.org/sumoftheparts.htm.


 

Sandra Bacon

Sandra Bacon is a versatile artist known for her paintings (and works on paper) as well as murals.   She shows widely in a variety of forums.   Recent gallery exhibitions include: ARC Gallery, Peter Jones Gallery, Betty Rymer Gallery ( all in Chicago) , Mt. Royal Gallery (Baltimore, Md.) and Peppers Art Center (Redlands, Ca).   Recent public art commissions include those from: Cool Globes (2), Washington D.C. Commission on the Arts, Carnegie Museum of Natural History (Pittsburgh) and the Department of Cultural Affairs (Chicago).

Sandra is a Golden Paint Working Artist and on the board of Chicago Women's Caucus on the Arts and Artists on the Bluff.

 

   

   

   

 

Judith Roth

Judith was born and grew up in Boston, MA where she graduated from Boston Museum School on scholarship with BFA from Tufts University.   She received a scholarship to Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture and later attended The School of the Art Institute of Chicago and Hyde Park Arts Center in Chicago.   

Judith has taught figure drawing and painting for many years, including classes at SAIC and Columbia college in Chicago, at The Art Center in Highland Park, IL and at the Figurative Art League in Evanston, IL and the Adler House in Libertyville.

She has received many awards and purchase prizes including an Illinois Arts Council Project Completion Grant which culminated in a one-person show at the Illinois Arts Council in Chicago.   Her work has been exhibited widely including exhibitions at the Butler Institute of American Art in Youngstown, Ohio; Maier Museum of Art, Lynchburg, Virginia; National Academy of Design in NY; J. Rosenthal Fine Arts, Ltd., in Chicago, IL.

She was selected by the Illinois Committee for the National Museum of Women in the Arts for her drawing "The Dance" which was part of the exhibition Illinois Women Artists:  The New Millennium, a show which traveled from the Thompson Center in Chicago to the National Museum of Women in the Arts in Washington, D.C.; then continued to travel to museums and galleries throughout Illinois for two years.

Her painting "War" was featured at Spertus Museum in Chicago in the exhibition Engaging with the Present:  The Contribution of the American Jewish Artists Club to Modern Art in Chicago (1928 - 2004).

Judith also has a large body of work currently on view at the Berman Center, a women's health and wellness facility located at 211 E. Ontario St. in Chicago.

Judith is a member and Past President of the Chicago Women's Caucus for Art.

 

   

   

 

David Rosenthall

David Rosenthall is a Chicago-based food and lifestyle photographer whose images have appeared in publication such as, Metropolis, Surface, and Dwell. Classically trained as a chef, his photographs are an extension of his passion for food, design, and life. Possessing a timeless aesthetic, David's photographs are always inviting and fresh.

 

Muscle Study #1

Color Photography

Muscle Study #2

Color Photography

Muscle Study #3

Color Photography

Muscle Study #4

Color Photography

Muscle Study #5

Color Photography

Muscle Study #6

Color Photography

Muscle Study #7

Color Photography

Muscle Study #8

Color Photography

 


Founded in 1991, Anatomically Correct is a not-for-profit organization dedicated to showcasing works by artists in alternative spaces in a combined effort to educate, diversify, and promote community awareness of the visual and performing arts.   


For more information or to purchase artwork, please contact:

Anatomically Correct

802

info@anatomicallycorrect.org